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UPDATED Oct. 26, 2020, at 7:50 PM

How To Vote In The 2020 Election

A state-by-state guide to voting in the age of COVID-19

How easy — or difficult — voting by mail is in each state

Everyone can vote by mail, and ballots are automatically mailed to votersEveryone can vote by mail, and mail-ballot applications are automatically mailed to votersEveryone can vote by mail, but nothing is automatically mailed to voters*You can vote by mail only if you have a valid excuse (the pandemic doesn’t count)
Ark.Ark.Tenn.Tenn.Ga.Ga.Miss.Miss.Fla.Fla.IdahoIdahoN.D.N.D.Minn.Minn.Ill.Ill.N.Y.N.Y.Pa.Pa.Nev.Nev.Ind.Ind.Colo.Colo.Va.Va.Calif.Calif.Mo.Mo.W.Va.W.Va.Md.Md.D.C.D.C.Wis.Wis.N.M.N.M.S.C.S.C.Ariz.Ariz.Kan.Kan.N.C.N.C.Okla.Okla.La.La.Ala.Ala.AlaskaAlaskaHawaiiHawaiiTexasTexasMont.Mont.Wash.Wash.Mich.Mich.Mass.Mass.N.J.N.J.Wyo.Wyo.Ore.Ore.S.D.S.D.IowaIowaOhioOhioConn.Conn.R.I.R.I.UtahUtahNeb.Neb.Ky.Ky.Del.Del.Vt.Vt.N.H.N.H.MaineMaine

*Includes states that allow anyone to use the pandemic as an excuse.

Alaska, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, New Mexico and Pennsylvania are mailing applications to at least 10 percent of voters, but not all of them. Montana is mailing ballots to 94 percent of voters.

Click on your state in the map to see a lot of the information you need in order to cast a ballot this fall — by whatever method you choose. This page will be updated on a regular basis with the latest developments. While we've made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this information, always double-check with your local election official before acting upon it. Thanks to the pandemic, election laws are constantly changing, and certain voters — like first-time voters or those living overseas — may be subject to special rules. If you think something is wrong or needs to be updated, please shoot us an email.

Alabama

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 19. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although two election officials can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot by using the “physical illness or infirmity” excuse. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 29.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be signed by two witnesses or a notary. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 and received by noon on Nov. 3. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office by Nov. 2. You must submit your ballot yourself. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The U.S. Supreme Court overturned a lower court ruling that allowed curbside voting.

Alaska

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 4. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Early voting generally available Oct. 19-Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although a poll worker can also attest to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state already mailed absentee-ballot applications to voters age 65 and older; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 24.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, absentee ballots no longer need to be signed by a witness or notary. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 13. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Alaska Supreme Court has struck down Alaska’s requirement that absentee ballots be signed by a witness or notary. In a separate case, the court also confirmed that absentee voters would not be notified before the election if their ballot is rejected.

Arizona

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 15. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties may offer early voting Oct. 7-30. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or two acceptable non-photo IDs to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all active voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 23.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a polling place or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. A family member, household member or caregiver may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

After a federal court ruled that Arizona’s voter registration deadline be extended several weeks, another court moved the deadline back up, to Oct. 15. However, this is still 10 days later than Arizona’s original voter registration deadline of Oct. 5.

Arkansas

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Early voting generally available Oct. 19-24, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can use fear of catching COVID-19 as an excuse to request an absentee ballot. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply by mail or online is Oct. 27; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

You must enclose a photocopy of your photo ID with your absentee ballot. Mailed ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office by Nov. 2. Someone else may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver more than two ballots per election. The deadline for someone else to drop off your ballot in person is Nov. 3. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

A federal judge has rejected a lawsuit that would have allowed absentee voters in Arkansas to correct signature problems with their ballots.

California

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 19. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Early voting generally available Oct. 5-Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area. Counties consolidating polling places must offer early voting at those polling places for at least eight hours per day Oct. 31-Nov. 2.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Counties have the option to consolidate polling places but must maintain a ratio of one precinct per 10,000 voters. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, California is automatically mailing ballots to all active voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 20. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Colorado

Registration illustration

Registration

To get a ballot in the mail, register to vote by Oct. 26. You can register online here. After Oct. 26, you can still register in person at a vote center up through Election Day (Nov. 3), but you will have to vote in person too.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Vote centers must offer early voting Oct. 19-23, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Vote centers may also offer it outside these dates; check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Colorado offers vote centers (where any voter in the county can vote) instead of traditional polling places. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Colorado automatically mails ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, vote center or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver more than 10 ballots per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Connecticut

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 27. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a designated Election Day Registration location on Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot by using the “COVID-19” excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all active voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. An immediate family member, caregiver, police officer or election official may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Delaware

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 10. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by noon on Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

District of Columbia

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., by mail) by Oct. 13. You can download a voter registration form here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a vote center up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Vote centers must offer early voting Oct. 27-Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and exact hours.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

The usual 144 polling places will be consolidated into 95 vote centers. You can vote at any vote center, not just the one in your neighborhood. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, Washington, D.C., is automatically mailing ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 13. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a vote center or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Florida

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 6. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 24-31. Counties may also offer it Oct. 19-23 and Nov. 1; check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. Broward, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, Palm Beach, Pinellas and Seminole counties are mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online on your county's website. The deadline to apply for a ballot to be mailed to you is Oct. 24; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 3.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, early-voting site or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Florida Department of State has issued guidance that ballot drop boxes must be staffed at all times — despite the fact that several counties have set up 24-hour drop boxes monitored only by video.

Georgia

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Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 13-16, Oct. 19-24 and Oct. 26-30. Counties may also offer it outside these dates; check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. DeKalb County is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 30.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Unless you have a physical disability, you must submit your ballot yourself. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

Staying a lower court ruling that extended Georgia’s absentee-ballot receipt deadline by three days, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated the requirement that all ballots arrive by Nov. 3.

Hawaii

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 5. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a vote center up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Vote centers must offer early voting Oct. 20-24, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and exact hours.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Hawaii offers vote centers (where any voter in the county can vote) instead of traditional polling places. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Hawaii automatically mails ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a vote center or ballot drop box; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Idaho

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 9. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place on Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties may offer early voting Oct. 19-30. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least one county (Canyon) is consolidating polling places into vote centers, meaning people can vote anywhere in the county. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply for a ballot to be mailed to you is Oct. 23; the deadline to apply in person is Oct. 30.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Illinois

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote in person or by mail by Oct. 6 or online by Oct. 18. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a designated grace-period voting location up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Jurisdictions may offer early voting Sept. 24-Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to most voters; you can also apply online or download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply by mail or online is Oct. 29; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 17. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you.

Indiana

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 6-9, Oct. 13-16, Oct. 19-24, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Counties may also offer it Oct. 10-12, Oct. 17-18, Oct. 25 and Nov. 1; check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least one county (Marion) is reducing the number of polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

In order to vote absentee, you must have an excuse, such as being age 65 or older, sick or out of town on Election Day. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 22.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by noon on Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office by Nov. 3. A member of your household or your attorney may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a lower court ruling that absentee ballots should count as long as they are postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 13.

Iowa

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 24. (If you register by mail, your form can also arrive after Oct. 24 as long as it’s postmarked by Oct. 19.) You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county auditor’s office or, sometimes, a satellite location. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although another registered voter in the precinct can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all active voters (and some counties are mailing them to inactive voters as well); you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 24.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 and received by noon on Nov. 9. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box at your local election office by Nov. 3. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Iowa Supreme Court has overturned a lower court ruling that allowed counties to send absentee-ballot applications to voters with some information already filled in.

Kansas

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 13. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer in-person advance voting Oct. 27-30 and Nov. 2. Counties may also offer it Oct. 14-26 and Oct. 31; check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least three counties (Douglas, Johnson and Shawnee) are reducing the number of polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an advance mail ballot without an excuse. Douglas, Johnson and Sedgwick counties already mailed advance mail ballot applications to all active voters; you can also download an advance mail ballot application here. The deadline to apply is Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Advance mail ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 6. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Kentucky

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 13-17, Oct. 19-24, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Some counties are consolidating polling places, but each must also open one vote center, where any voter in the county can vote. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also provide an acceptable non-photo ID if you sign an affidavit stating that you have a reasonable impediment to getting a photo ID. An election official can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot if they are concerned about spreading or contracting COVID-19. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply online is Oct. 9; the deadline to apply by mail or in person is Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 6. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Louisiana

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote in person or by mail by Oct. 5 or online by Oct. 13. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Parishes must offer early voting Oct. 16, Oct. 18-24 and Oct. 26-27. Check this website for locations and exact hours.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

In order to vote absentee, you must have an excuse, such as being age 65 or older, in the hospital or out of town on Election Day. Having a medical condition that puts you at higher risk from COVID-19, being under a quarantine order, experiencing the symptoms of COVID-19 and caring for someone in quarantine also count.You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply is Oct. 30.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be signed by a witness. Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 2. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop site; check with local election officials for drop-site locations. An immediate family member may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

New Orleans is suing the state in an effort to allow absentee ballots to be dropped off at sites other than local election offices. The court has temporarily allowed multiple ballot drop sites until it issues a final ruling in the coming days.

Maine

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by mail by Oct. 19 or in person by Nov. 3. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your municipal clerk’s office (you won’t need to fill out an absentee-ballot application).

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply is Oct. 29.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone who is not a candidate or their family member may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot possess more than five ballots at a time. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Maine Supreme Court has rejected a lawsuit that sought to extend the deadline for absentee ballots to be received.

Maryland

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 13. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

About 80 vote centers will offer early voting Oct. 26-Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and exact hours.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

The usual 1,600 polling places will be consolidated into about 360 vote centers. You can vote at any vote center in your county. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 20.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by 10 a.m. on Nov. 13. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, vote center or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Another adult who is not a candidate may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Massachusetts

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 24. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Municipalities must offer early voting Oct. 17-30. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request a mail ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing mail-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for a mail ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 28.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 6. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. A family member may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Michigan

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote most ways (including online and by mail) by Oct. 19 or at your county, city or township clerk’s office by Nov. 3. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county, city or township clerk’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state already mailed absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply for a ballot to be mailed to you is Oct. 30; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. An immediate family member or other member of your household may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Michigan Court of Appeals has overturned a lower court decision that extended the deadline for absentee ballots to be received and lifted restrictions on who can return someone else’s ballot.

Minnesota

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 13. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Sept. 18, Sept. 21-25, Sept. 28-Oct. 2, Oct. 5-9, Oct. 13-16, Oct. 19-23, Oct. 26-31 and Nov. 2. Counties may also offer it outside these dates; check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Jurisdictions with fewer than 400 registered voters have the option to close traditional polling places, although in-person voting will still be available at local election offices. For 2020, jurisdictions containing 217,056 registered voters have opted for this arrangement. Voters in other jurisdictions can look up the location of their polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Jurisdictions with fewer than 400 registered voters have the option to mail ballots to all voters; for 2020, jurisdictions containing 217,056 registered voters have opted to do so. Elsewhere, any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, registered voters no longer need to get their ballots signed by a witness or notary. Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 10. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office or ballot drop site by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-site locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver ballots for more than three other voters per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

A federal judge has upheld Minnesota’s decision to count ballots that arrive after Election Day. However, Republicans challenging the plan say they will appeal.

Mississippi

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

In order to vote absentee, you must have an excuse, such as being age 65 or older, sick or out of town on Election Day. Being under “physician-imposed quarantine” or caring for someone in quarantine also count. Request an absentee ballot through your county circuit clerk’s office. The deadline to vote absentee in person is Oct. 31; there is no specific deadline to request a mailed ballot, but be sure to do so early enough that it has time to reach you before Election Day.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be notarized. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 10. Absentee ballots may not be dropped off in person. State law does not address whether someone else can mail your ballot for you; check with local election officials.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

In response to a lawsuit from voting-rights groups, Mississippi will allow curbside voting for people with symptoms of COVID-19 and allow absentee voters to fix problems with signatures on their ballots.

Missouri

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 7. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least one jurisdiction (St. Louis County) is switching from traditional polling places to vote centers, meaning people can vote anywhere in the county. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request a mail-in ballot without an excuse. You can download a mail-in ballot application here. People with an excuse, including having caught COVID-19 or being at high risk from it, can also request a regular absentee ballot. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply by mail or fax is Oct. 21; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Mail-in ballots and most absentee ballots must be notarized; however, people who use the “contracted or at risk for coronavirus” or “incapacity or confinement due to illness” excuse to cast an absentee ballot do not need to notarize their ballot. Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. Mail-in ballots may not be dropped off in person, but absentee ballots can be dropped off in person at a local election office. A family member may submit your ballot for you.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

A judge briefly ruled that mail-in ballots could be dropped off in person, but the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals stayed his decision.

Montana

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., by mail) by Oct. 24. You can download a voter registration form here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a late-registration location up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Forty-five counties, containing 94 percent of Montana’s registered voters, are closing traditional polling places, although some in-person voting must still be available. However, the remaining 11 counties will operate traditional polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although you can also fill out a form to confirm your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, 45 counties, containing 94 percent of Montana’s registered voters, are automatically mailing ballots to all voters. In the remaining 11 counties, any voter can still request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by noon on Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you, and there is no limit to the number of ballots a person may deliver. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The Montana Supreme Court has overturned a lower-court ruling that ballots should count as long as they are postmarked by Election Day and received within nine days.

Nebraska

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote most ways (including online and by mail) by Oct. 16 or in person at an election office by Oct. 23. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

County election offices must offer early voting Oct. 5-9, Oct. 13-16, Oct. 19-23, Oct. 26-30 and Nov. 2. They may also offer it Oct. 10-12, Oct. 17-18, Oct. 24-25 and Oct. 31-Nov. 1; check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Counties with fewer than 10,000 residents have the option to close traditional polling places, although in-person voting will still be available at county election offices. So far, 11 counties have opted for this arrangement. Voters in larger counties can look up the location of their polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Counties with fewer than 10,000 residents have the option to mail ballots to all voters; so far, 11 counties have opted to do so. Elsewhere, any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply is Oct. 23.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone who is not a candidate or a campaign staffer (unless they are your family member) may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver ballots for more than two other voters per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Nevada

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote in person or by mail by Oct. 6 or online by Oct. 29. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 17, Oct. 19-24 and Oct. 26-30. Counties may also offer it Oct. 18 and Oct. 25; check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

There must be at least 100 vote centers open in Clark County, 25 in Washoe County and one in Carson City and every other county. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, Nevada is automatically mailing ballots to all active voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 10. Ballots with a missing or illegible postmark will also be counted if they arrive by Nov. 6. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, vote center or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

New Hampshire

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways by Oct. 21-28 (the exact deadline varies by municipality). Because of the pandemic, any voter can use fear of catching COVID-19 as an excuse to register remotely; contact your city or town clerk for a voter registration form and an absentee voter registration affidavit, which must be signed by a witness. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place on Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your city or town clerk’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although an election official can also attest to your identity. You can also sign a challenged voter affidavit and vote a regular ballot, but you must respond to a notice the state sends you after the election or you will be investigated for voter fraud.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can use fear of catching COVID-19 as an excuse to request an absentee ballot. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply is Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. A family member, someone legally assisting you with voting or, if you live in a nursing home or residential care facility, a facility staffer may submit your ballot for you, although someone legally assisting you with voting cannot deliver more than four ballots per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

New Jersey

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 13. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county clerk’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Fewer polling places will be open; however, each municipality must open at least one polling place, and counties must open at least 50 percent of their polling places. Votes cast in person will be provisional ballots. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, New Jersey is automatically mailing ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 10, or received by Nov. 5 if not postmarked due to postal error. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone who is not a candidate may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver more than three ballots per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

New Mexico

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 6. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at your county clerk’s office or another early-voting location up through Oct. 31.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Early voting generally available Oct. 6-31. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. Ten counties, including Bernalillo, Doña Ana, Sandoval and Santa Fe, are mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 20.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. An immediate family member or caregiver may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

New York

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 9. (Some people — those who are honorably discharged from the military or become a naturalized citizen after Oct. 9 — can register in person by Oct. 24.) If mailed, your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 9 and received by Oct. 14. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 24-Nov. 1. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot if they are afraid of contracting COVID-19. Monroe County already mailed absentee-ballot applications to all active voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply by mail or online is Oct. 27; the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 10. Ballots that arrive by Nov. 4 will also be counted even if they lack a postmark. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box at your local election office or polling place by Nov. 3. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials.

North Carolina

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 9. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at one-stop absentee voting locations up through Oct. 31.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 15-31. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, absentee ballots must be signed by only one witness, not two. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 12. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box at your local election office by Nov. 3 or early-voting site by Oct. 31. A family member may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a legal settlement reached by the state to extend the absentee-ballot receipt deadline to Nov. 12 and set up ballot drop boxes. However, Republicans say they will appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

North Dakota

Registration illustration

Registration

North Dakota does not have voter registration.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties may offer early voting Oct. 19-Nov. 2. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

The usual 225 polling places will be consolidated into 115. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state already mailed absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. There is no specific deadline to apply, but if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 and received by Nov. 9. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 2; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone who is not a candidate or a campaign staffer may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver ballots for more than four voters per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Ohio

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 6-9, Oct. 12-16 and Oct. 19-Nov. 2. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least one county (Jackson) is reducing the number of polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by noon on Oct. 31 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 and received by Nov. 13. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box at your local election office by Nov. 3. A family member may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

Voting-rights advocates have dropped their lawsuit challenging Ohio’s ban on ballot drop boxes at sites other than local election offices.

Oklahoma

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 9. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

County election offices must offer early voting Oct. 29-31. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply is Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots with a yellow stripe must either be notarized or include a photocopy of an acceptable photo or non-photo ID. Absentee ballots with a pink stripe (available only to voters with COVID-19 or who are at high risk for COVID-19) must either be signed by two witnesses or include a photocopy of an acceptable ID. Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. Absentee ballots with a pink stripe may not be dropped off in person, but absentee ballots with a yellow stripe can be dropped off in person at a local election office by Nov. 2. Your spouse may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Oregon

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 13. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting from the day ballots are issued to Nov. 2. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Oregon offers in-person voting at election offices instead of traditional polling places. You can look up the location of your election office on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Oregon automatically mails ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Pennsylvania

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 19. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can cast a “mail” ballot in person at your county election office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least two counties (Montgomery and Philadelphia) are reducing the number of polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request a mail-in ballot without an excuse. Allegheny County is mailing mail-in ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for a mail-in ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 6. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. You must submit your ballot yourself. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

On Oct. 19, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to overturn a state court ruling that absentee ballots should be counted as long as they are received by Nov. 6 and no evidence exists that they were mailed after Election Day. However, Republicans are challenging the deadline again in hopes that the Supreme Court will rule differently with Amy Coney Barrett.

Rhode Island

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 4. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person in the presidential race only at a designated location on Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Boards of canvassers must offer early voting Oct. 14-16, Oct. 19-23, Oct. 26-30 and Nov. 2. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all active voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 13. However, after that date, any voter can request an emergency ballot if they have any reason to believe they won’t be able to vote on Election Day. Request an emergency ballot through your local board of canvassers. Election officials must receive your application for an emergency ballot by Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, ballots no longer need to be signed by two witnesses or a notary. Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at the state election office or a ballot drop box; check this website for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

After fewer people than expected applied to vote by mail, Rhode Island is scrambling to find new sites to replace 130 polling places that are no longer available.

South Carolina

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote in person (assuming the registering office is open on weekends, which it might not be) or online by Oct. 4 or by mail by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county election office or, sometimes, a satellite location. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. The deadline to apply for a ballot to be mailed to you is Oct. 24 (or Oct. 30 for a voter’s authorized representative); the deadline to apply in person is Nov. 2.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be signed by a witness. Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office. Someone who is not a candidate or a campaign staffer (unless they are your immediate family member) may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

The U.S. Supreme Court blocked a lower court ruling that struck down the requirement that absentee ballots be signed by a witness. For now, the witness requirement stands.

South Dakota

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 19. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county auditor’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state already mailed absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone else may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Tennessee

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 14-17, Oct. 19-24 and Oct. 26-29. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

In order to vote absentee, you must have an excuse, such as being age 60 or older, sick or out of town on Election Day. People with underlying medical conditions that put them at heightened risk from COVID-19 or their caretakers can request an absentee ballot by using the illness excuse. You can download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 27.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. Absentee ballots may not be dropped off in person. You must mail your ballot yourself. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

Following a court ruling, Tennessee will now allow first-time voters to vote absentee if they enclose a photocopy of their ID instead of having to show their ID in person.

Texas

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 5. You can download a voter registration form here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Early voting generally available Oct. 13-30. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Some counties in Texas offer vote centers (where any voter in the county can vote) instead of traditional polling places. Some extra counties are switching to vote centers this year because of the pandemic. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls, although you can also provide an acceptable non-photo ID if you sign an affidavit stating that you have a reasonable impediment to getting a photo ID.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

In order to vote absentee, you must have an excuse, such as being age 65 or older, having a disability or being out of town on Election Day. Bexar, Harris and Hidalgo counties are mailing absentee-ballot applications to voters age 65 and older; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 23.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 4. You can also drop off your ballot in person at one ballot drop site per county on or before Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-site locations. You must submit your ballot yourself.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

Multiple state courts have ruled against Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive order limiting counties to one ballot drop site each, although those rulings are currently on hold as the Texas Supreme Court considers the case. A similar lawsuit is also being appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Utah

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., online, by mail) by Oct. 23. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Vote centers must offer early voting Oct. 20-23 and Oct. 26-30. Vote centers may also offer it Oct. 24-25 and Oct. 31-Nov. 2; check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Utah offers vote centers (where any voter in the county can vote) instead of traditional polling places. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or two acceptable non-photo IDs to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Utah automatically mails ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 and received by noon on the day of the county canvass (which varies by county but may be as late as Nov. 17). You can also drop off your ballot in person at a ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. A member of your household or someone legally assisting you with voting may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Vermont

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Nov. 3. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your city or town clerk’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, Vermont is automatically mailing ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office (no later than Nov. 2), Election Day polling place or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. Someone who is not a candidate or a campaign staffer (unless they are your immediate family member or caretaker) may submit your ballot for you. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Virginia

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 15. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Jurisdictions must offer early voting Sept. 18, Sept. 21-25, Sept. 28-Oct. 2, Oct. 5-9, Oct. 13-16, Oct. 19-24 and Oct. 26-31. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although you can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. The deadline to apply by mail, email or fax is Oct. 23; the deadline to apply in person is Oct. 31.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, absentee ballots no longer need to be signed by a witness. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by noon on Nov. 6. Ballots with a missing or illegible postmark will also be counted if they arrive by then. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations.You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

After Virginia’s online voter registration portal crashed on the original deadline to register to vote, a court ordered that registration remain open until 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 15.

Washington

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote online or by mail by Oct. 26 or in person by Nov. 3. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Vote centers must offer early voting Oct. 16, Oct. 19-23, Oct. 26-30 and Nov. 2. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

Washington offers vote centers (where any voter in the county can vote) instead of traditional polling places. You can look up vote centers close to you on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Washington automatically mails ballots to all voters.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 23. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check this website for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

West Virginia

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote by Oct. 13. You can register online here.

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Counties must offer early voting Oct. 21-24 and Oct. 26-31. Check this website for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo or non-photo ID to the polls, although an adult who has known you for at least six months and shows his or her photo ID can also sign an affidavit attesting to your identity. A poll worker who has known you for at least six months can also attest to your identity.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Because of the pandemic, any voter can request an absentee ballot by using the “illness, injury or other medical reason” excuse. You can apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 28.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 9. You can also drop off your ballot in person at a local election office by Nov. 2. Someone else may submit your ballot for you, although a person cannot deliver more than two ballots per election. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

Wisconsin

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote online or by mail by Oct. 14 or at your municipal clerk’s office by Oct. 30. You can register online here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place on Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

Municipalities may offer in-person absentee voting Oct. 20-Nov. 1. Check with local election officials for locations and the exact schedule in your area.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Remember to bring an acceptable photo ID to the polls.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state is mailing absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also apply for an absentee ballot online here. Election officials must receive your application by Oct. 29.

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be signed by a witness. Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office, polling place or ballot drop box by Nov. 3; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials. You can track the status of your ballot at this website.

What we’re watching illustration

What we’re watching

After a series of dueling court rulings over whether absentee ballots that arrive after Nov. 3 can count, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with Republicans and ruled that all ballots must be received by Election Day.

Wyoming

Registration illustration

Registration

Register to vote the usual ways (e.g., by mail) by Oct. 19. You can download a voter registration form here. You can also simultaneously register and vote in person at a polling place up through Election Day (Nov. 3).

Voting early illustration

Voting early

No true early voting, but you can vote absentee in person at your county clerk’s office.

In person voting illustration

In-person voting

At least one county (Park) is reducing the number of polling places. You can look up the location of your polling place on this website. Most people are not required to show ID to vote.

Requesting an absentee ballot illustration

Requesting an absentee ballot

Any voter can request an absentee ballot without an excuse. The state already mailed absentee-ballot applications to all voters; you can also download an absentee-ballot application here. Election officials must receive your application by Nov. 2 (if you’re not applying in person, be sure to apply early enough that your ballot has time to reach you before Election Day).

Submitting an absentee ballot illustration

Submitting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots must be received by Nov. 3. You can either mail your ballot or drop it off in person at a local election office or ballot drop box; check with local election officials for drop-box locations. State law does not address whether someone else can return your ballot for you; check with local election officials.

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