UPDATED May 20, 2022, at 5:12 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Kansas
Status:Tabled
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
4 districts
majority
This map
4 districts
There are 3 Republican-leaning seats and 1 highly competitive seat in this proposed map.Change from old map: None.
The competitiveness and fairness of Kansas's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
"Buffalo 2" planD+2.2
"Bluestem" planD+2.2
"Meadowlark 5" planD+0.7
"Meadowlark 6" planR+0.6
"Eagle" planR+0.8
"Patriot" planR+0.8
"Mushroom Rock 2" planR+1.0
"Sunflower 3" planR+1.0
"Prairie Dog" planR+1.9
"United" planR+2.1
"Wildcat" planR+2.5
Old mapR+3.0
"Ad Astra" planR+3.4
"Ad Astra 3" planR+3.4
New mapR+3.4
"Sunflower" planR+4.4
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapR+5.0
"Patriot" planR+5.1
"Eagle" planR+5.1
"Wildcat" planR+5.1
"Sunflower 3" planR+5.4
"Sunflower" planR+5.6
New mapR+5.7
"Ad Astra 3" planR+5.7
"Ad Astra" planR+5.7
"Meadowlark 5" planR+5.7
"Meadowlark 6" planR+5.7
"Mushroom Rock 2" planR+7.1
"United" planR+7.1
"Bluestem" planR+7.2
"Buffalo 2" planR+7.2
"Prairie Dog" planR+7.2
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map1/4
"Ad Astra" plan1/4
New map1/4
"Ad Astra 3" plan1/4
"Eagle" plan1/4
"Mushroom Rock 2" plan1/4
"Patriot" plan1/4
"Sunflower" plan1/4
"Wildcat" plan1/4
"Bluestem" plan0/4
"Buffalo 2" plan0/4
"Meadowlark 5" plan0/4
"Meadowlark 6" plan0/4
"Prairie Dog" plan0/4
"Sunflower 3" plan0/4
"United" plan0/4
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Kansas
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Tracey MannR
R+45
2nd
Jake LaTurnerR
R+14
3rd
Sharice DavidsD
D+5
4th
Ron EstesR
R+32

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Kansas

May 18, 2022

On May 18, the Kansas Supreme Court upheld Kansas’s new Republican-passed congressional map, saying it did not violate the state constitution. The decision overturned a lower court’s finding that the map dilutes the votes of both Democrats and nonwhite Kansans. The decision clears the way for the map to be used in the 2022 election.

The new map creates three Republican-leaning seats and one highly competitive seat, same as the current configuration. However, it would split up majority-minority Wyandotte County (where Kansas City is located) for the first time since the 1980s, taking the 3rd District from a FiveThirtyEight partisan lean of D+4 to R+3. This will likely endanger the reelection prospects of Rep. Sharice Davids, Kansas’s only Democratic member of Congress.

The map became law in early February despite opposition from Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly. Republicans in the Kansas Legislature overrode her veto by the skin of their teeth: The override got the minimum 27 necessary votes in the state Senate and one over the required 84 votes in the state House.

Latest updates
Icon of the Kansas state boundaries
April 29
Kansas Secretary of State Scott Schwab appealed the decision striking down the state's congressional map. The Kansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the appeal on May 16, 2022.
Icon of the Kansas state boundaries
April 25
A Kansas state judge found the recently-enacted congressional redistricting plan unconstitutional on both partisan gerrymandering and minority vote dilution grounds.
Icon of the Kansas state boundaries
March 4
The Kansas Supreme Court declined to dismiss two pending redistricting lawsuits after Kansas Secretary of State Scott Schwab petitioned them to do so.

Latest changes 🤖

Our latest coverage

Who controls redistricting in Kansas right now?
Republicans fully control the congressional redistricting process. New maps are drawn and passed by the Republican state legislature and signed into law by the Democratic governor (but legislative Republicans have the numbers to override a potential veto).