UPDATED Jun. 23, 2022, at 2:05 AM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

The partisan breakdown of New York’s new map
Status:Approved
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
27 districts
majority
This map
26 districts-1
There are 16 Democratic-leaning seats, 6 Republican-leaning seats and 4 highly competitive seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: -1 Democratic-leaning seat, -1 Republican-leaning seat, +1 highly competitive seat.

Map source: Jonathan Cervas

The competitiveness and fairness of New York's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Old mapR+2.6
New mapR+6.5
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
New mapD+5.8
Old mapR+1.3
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
New map4/26
Old map3/27
The demographic and partisan breakdown of New York’s new map
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Lee ZeldinR
R+5
2nd
Andrew R. GarbarinoR
R+6
3rd
Thomas SuozziD
D+4
4th
Kathleen RiceD
D+10
5th
Gregory W. MeeksD
D+62
6th
Grace MengD
D+31
7th
Nydia M. VelázquezD
D+63
8th
Hakeem JeffriesD
D+52
9th
Yvette D. ClarkeD
D+51
10th
Mondaire JonesD
D+69
11th
Nicole MalliotakisR
R+11
12th
Jerrold NadlerD
Carolyn MaloneyD
D+68
13th
Adriano EspaillatD
D+77
14th
Alexandria Ocasio-CortezD
D+57
15th
Ritchie TorresD
D+71
16th
Jamaal BowmanD
D+40
17th
Sean Patrick MaloneyD
D+7
18th
OPEN
D+3
19th
OPEN
R+1
20th
Paul D. TonkoD
D+14
21st
Elise StefanikR
R+17
22nd
John KatkoR
D+2
23rd
Chris JacobsR
R+23
24th
Claudia TenneyR
R+22
25th
Joseph D. MorelleD
D+13
26th
Brian HigginsD
D+18

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in New York

May 23, 2022

Just before midnight May 20, a New York state court approved a new congressional map drawn by a court-appointed neutral expert, Jonathan Cervas. Cervas’s map has an efficiency gap of D+6 and creates 16 Democratic-leaning seats, six Republican-leaning seats and four highly competitive seats. This represents an increase of one highly competitive seat, a decrease of one Democratic-leaning seat and a decrease of one Republican-leaning seat compared with the old map.

The new map pits some high-profile Democratic incumbents against each other in the New York City area, like Reps. Carolyn Maloney and Jerrold Nadler in the new 12th District in Upper Manhattan. Meanwhile, Rep. Mondaire Jones has announced he will run in the newly drawn 10th District (representing parts of Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan) to avoid a primary against Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney in the district he currently represents. The state’s primaries will be held Aug. 23.

Cervas’s appointment came after the New York Court of Appeals struck down a previous map passed by Democratic legislators, which the court found to be an extreme Democratic gerrymander. That map was designed to give Democrats a huge advantage in the state and was largely approved along partisan lines in the legislature. The map had an efficiency gap of D+9 and created 20 Democratic-leaning seats, only four Republican-leaning seats and two highly competitive seats (both of which tilted toward Democrats themselves).

New York wound up with such an egregiously biased map only because of the weakness of New York’s new bipartisan redistricting commission. Under state law, the legislature may simply draw its own map after rejecting the commission’s first two proposals. Even worse, the commission didn’t even work as intended. Its first proposal was actually two maps (one favoring Democrats and one favoring Republicans), and it failed to come to any agreement on a second-round proposal, handing redistricting control to the legislature by default.

Latest updates
Icon of the New York state boundaries
May 16
A special master published new congressional and state Senate maps, under the direction of the New York Court of Appeals.
Icon of the New York state boundaries
May 10
A federal judge ordered New York to postpone its congressional primary from June 28 to August 23 to accommodate the effort to draw new districts.
Icon of the New York state boundaries
April 27
The highest state court in New York, called the Court of Appeals, upheld a lower court ruling that the state's new congressional maps violate the state constitution. A special master will work with the lower court to draw new districts.

Our latest coverage

Who controls redistricting in New York right now?
Democrats fully control the congressional redistricting process. New maps are drawn by a bipartisan commission made up of citizens, but the Democratic state legislature can modify or reject the commission's proposals. The final map must be passed by two-thirds of each chamber and signed into law by the Democratic governor.