UPDATED Jan. 24, 2022, at 5:40 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Pennsylvania
Status:Proposed
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
18 districts
majority
This map
17 districts-1
There are 5 Democratic-leaning seats, 9 Republican-leaning seats and 3 highly competitive seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: -1 Democratic-leaning seat.
The competitiveness and fairness of Pennsylvania's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Governor's proposalD+2.7
Old mapR+2.3
Updated preliminary planR+6.6
Preliminary planR+7.3
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Governor's proposalD+2.9
Old mapD+1.0
Updated preliminary planR+3.5
Preliminary planR+3.5
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map3/18
Governor's proposal3/17
Preliminary plan3/17
Updated preliminary plan3/17
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Pennsylvania
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Brian FitzpatrickR
EVEN
2nd
Brendan BoyleD
D+43
3rd
Dwight EvansD
D+78
4th
Madeleine DeanD
D+23
5th
Mary Gay ScanlonD
D+21
6th
Chrissy HoulahanD
D+1
7th
Susan WildD
R+3
8th
Matt CartwrightD
R+13
9th
Dan MeuserR
R+39
10th
Scott PerryR
R+22
11th
Lloyd SmuckerR
R+23
12th
Glenn W. ThompsonR
R+38
13th
Fred KellerR
John JoyceR
R+38
14th
Guy ReschenthalerR
R+39
15th
Mike DoyleD
D+27
16th
Mike KellyR
R+24
17th
Conor LambD
R+10

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Pennsylvania

Jan. 18, 2022

The Pennsylvania state House voted on Jan. 12 to approve the new congressional map proposal approved by the House State Government committee last month. The map will now go to the state Senate for approval.

However, on Jan. 15, Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf released his own map, saying in a press release that the House Republican map “does not comply with those basic principles” of a fair map but that his map (and another drawn by a nonprofit) does. Wolf’s map would result in six Democratic-leaning seats, eight Republican-leaning seats and three highly competitive seats, with a median seat bias of D+2.7 and an efficiency gap of D+2.9. This is in contrast to the House’s approved map, which would create five Democratic-leaning seats, nine GOP-leaning seats and three competitive seats, with a median seat bias of R+6.6 and an efficiency gap of R+3.5.

Wolf’s signature is necessary for any map to become law, and he and state Republican lawmakers may be facing a stalemate. If that’s the case, the courts may be forced to step in: ​​The Commonwealth Court has fast-tracked a lawsuit and is requiring all parties to submit proposed maps by Jan. 24. If a final map is not produced by Jan. 30, then the court will impose one.

Latest updates
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
Dec. 9, 2021
The State Government Committee in Pennsylvania's state House selected its preferred congressional map from among 19 that were submitted by the public. The Committee will formally vote on the map next week.
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
Nov. 30, 2021
Pennsylvania Gov. Wolf published a list of redistricting principles generated by his advisory redistricting council.
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
Sept. 13, 2021
Pennsylvania Governor Wolf announces the creation of a Redistricting Advisory Council to provide him guidance when he reviews congressional redistricting plans proposed by the General Assembly over the next several weeks.

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Pennsylvania
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
Governor's proposalProposedGov. Tom Wolf
Updated preliminary planProposedRepublican state Rep. Seth Grove
Preliminary planTabledRepublican state Rep. Seth Grove / Pennsylvania resident Amanda Holt