UPDATED Jan. 27, 2022, at 4:15 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

partisan lean of districts:
States with proposed maps
New maps
Majority
Old maps
There are 130 Democratic-leaning seats, 127 Republican-leaning seats and 21 highly competitive seats in the new maps so far.Change from old maps: +7 Democratic-leaning seats, +1 Republican-leaning seat, -6 highly competitive seats.

The latest with redistricting

Jan. 27, 2022

Twenty-eight states — most recently South Carolina — have now finished redrawing their congressional maps (not counting the six states with only one congressional district). And several other states are already deep into the process. For instance, proposed maps in Kansas and Tennessee have passed the legislature and are currently sitting on the governor’s desk.

At this point, redistricting has created seven more Democratic-leaning seats nationally, one more Republican-leaning seat and six fewer highly competitive seats. However, because many of those newly blue seats are already held by Democrats, it’s actually Republicans who have gained a handful of House seats through the redistricting process so far. Republicans have also converted light-red districts into safer seats in states like Indiana, Oklahoma and Utah.

However, it’s still too early to know which party will emerge from redistricting in a better position. There are still two big states that have yet to finish redistricting — Democratic-controlled New York and Republican-controlled Florida — and it will make a big difference whether they draw maximally aggressive maps or relatively fair ones. For instance, in Florida, a bipartisan map has already passed the state Senate, but Gov. Ron DeSantis has proposed an alternative that would give Republicans more seats.

Another big wild card is how many new maps get overturned in court. The Ohio Supreme Court has already thrown out Republicans’ first attempt to draw a new map in the Buckeye State, and a federal court has also ruled that Alabama’s new map violates the Voting Rights Act because it creates only one Black-majority district when it was possible to draw two — a decision that could also lead to additional Black-opportunity districts in South Carolina and Louisiana. There is also a chance that the North Carolina Supreme Court will overturn that state’s new map.

Latest updates
Icon of the Connecticut state boundaries
Jan. 27
The Connecticut Supreme Court heard oral arguments from the Democratic and Republican members of the Connecticut Reapportionment Commission.
Icon of the Michigan state boundaries
Jan. 26
The Michigan state Supreme Court heard oral arguments for a challenge to the state's new congressional districts. Plaintiffs argued that the new districts, drawn by the state's independent redistricting commission, dilute the voting power of racial minority communities in violation of the Voting Rights Act.
Icon of the Michigan state boundaries
Jan. 26
The general counsel for Michigan's Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission announced her resignation, effective Feb. 25.
How the partisan makeup of each state has changed
Which party gained the most ground in each state’s new map, along with how red or blue its old and new districts are based on partisan lean
Partisan lean
State
Which party gained?
Old mapNew map
Icon of the Arizona state boundariesArizonaRepublicans gained ground
Icon of the Arkansas state boundariesArkansasNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the California state boundariesCaliforniaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Colorado state boundariesColoradoNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Georgia state boundariesGeorgia
In litigation
Neither party gained much ground
Icon of the Idaho state boundariesIdaho
In litigation
Neither party gained much ground
Icon of the Illinois state boundariesIllinoisDemocrats gained ground
Icon of the Indiana state boundariesIndianaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Iowa state boundariesIowaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Kentucky state boundariesKentuckyNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Maine state boundariesMaineNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Maryland state boundariesMaryland
In litigation
Neither party gained much ground
Icon of the Massachusetts state boundariesMassachusettsNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Michigan state boundariesMichigan
In litigation
Neither party gained much ground
Icon of the Mississippi state boundariesMississippiNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Montana state boundariesMontanaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Nebraska state boundariesNebraskaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Nevada state boundariesNevada
In litigation
Democrats gained ground
Icon of the New Jersey state boundariesNew Jersey
In litigation
Democrats gained ground
Icon of the New Mexico state boundariesNew Mexico
In litigation
Democrats gained ground
Icon of the North Carolina state boundariesNorth Carolina
In litigation
Republicans gained ground
Icon of the Oklahoma state boundariesOklahomaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Oregon state boundariesOregonDemocrats gained ground
Icon of the South Carolina state boundariesSouth CarolinaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Texas state boundariesTexas
In litigation
Neither party gained much ground
Icon of the Utah state boundariesUtahNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the Virginia state boundariesVirginiaNeither party gained much ground
Icon of the West Virginia state boundariesWest VirginiaNeither party gained much ground

States marked as “in litigation” face pending lawsuits related to approved maps, as tracked by All About Redistricting.

When we can expect new state maps
Final deadlines for each state to have approved congressional maps, including how far along it is in the process and how red or blue its current districts are based on partisan lean
Partisan lean
State
Deadline
Status
Old mapNew map
Icon of the Alabama state boundariesAlabamaFeb. 11, 20225 maps proposed
Icon of the Connecticut state boundariesConnecticutDec. 21, 202113 maps proposed
Icon of the Florida state boundariesFloridaJune 13, 202217 maps proposed
Icon of the Hawaii state boundariesHawaiiFeb. 27, 20222 maps proposed
Icon of the Kansas state boundariesKansasJune 1, 202215 maps proposed
Icon of the Louisiana state boundariesLouisianaJuly 22, 2022No maps proposed
Icon of the Minnesota state boundariesMinnesotaFeb. 15, 20227 maps proposed
Icon of the Missouri state boundariesMissouriFeb. 22, 20222 maps proposed
Icon of the New Hampshire state boundariesNew HampshireJune 1, 20222 maps proposed
Icon of the New York state boundariesNew YorkApril 4, 20224 maps proposed
Icon of the Ohio state boundariesOhioFeb. 13, 20225 maps proposed
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundariesPennsylvaniaFeb. 15, 202215 maps proposed
Icon of the Rhode Island state boundariesRhode IslandJune 27, 20222 maps proposed
Icon of the Tennessee state boundariesTennesseeApril 7, 20223 maps proposed
Icon of the Washington state boundariesWashingtonFeb. 8, 20225 maps proposed
Icon of the Wisconsin state boundariesWisconsinApril 15, 20226 maps proposed