UPDATED Oct. 16, 2021, at 4:20 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond.

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Ohio
Status:Proposed
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
16 districts
majority
This map
15 districts-1
There are 4 Democratic-leaning seats, 8 Republican-leaning seats and 3 highly competitive seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: +1 Democratic-leaning seat, -4 Republican-leaning seats, +2 highly competitive seats.
The competitiveness and fairness of Ohio's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
State Senate Democratic Caucus planD+4.0
Old mapR+3.6
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
State Senate Democratic Caucus planD+4.8
Old mapR+19.9
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
State Senate Democratic Caucus plan3/15
Old map1/16
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Ohio
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Joyce BeattyD
D+27
2nd
Troy BaldersonR
D+10
3rd
OPEN
D+49
4th
Anthony GonzalezR
R+3
5th
Steve ChabotR
D+11
6th
Warren DavidsonR
R+34
7th
OPEN
R+1
8th
Bill JohnsonR
R+39
9th
Michael TurnerR
R+8
10th
Marcy KapturD
D+1
11th
Tim RyanD
David JoyceR
R+13
12th
Brad WenstrupR
R+44
13th
Jim JordanR
R+39
14th
Bob GibbsR
R+42
15th
Robert E. LattaR
R+51

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Ohio

Sept. 29, 2021

On Sept. 29, Ohio Democrats released the first proposed congressional map we’ve seen out of the Buckeye State, and unsurprisingly, it provides plenty of opportunities for the party, creating new Democratic-leaning seats in Cincinnati and the Columbus suburbs as well as three competitive seats in northern Ohio. However, with Republicans in control of Ohio’s complicated redistricting process, the map is unlikely to become law.

The deadline for the first step in that process is coming up — the legislature has until Sept. 30 to pass a congressional map that lasts through the 2030 election with a bipartisan, three-fifths vote. If that doesn’t happen (and it probably won’t), a commission made up of Democratic and Republican politicians will have until Oct. 31 to enact a map — and if that commission fails, the legislature has until Nov. 30 to take one final crack at it. This time, they would be able to pass a map with a bare majority, but it would expire after the 2024 election.

Latest updates
Icon of the Ohio state boundaries
Sept. 30
Ohio lawmakers failed to meet their deadline to draw new congressional districts, giving the seven-member Ohio Redistricting Commission the opportunity to pass a map backed by at least four members and both Democrats.
Icon of the Ohio state boundaries
Sept. 27
The Ohio Organizing Collaborative, Ohio chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, Ohio Environmental Council and six Ohioans filed a lawsuit against the Ohio Redistricting Commission on the basis that the recently approved maps dilute the votes of Black Ohioans, Muslims and other minorities in the state.

Latest changes 🤖

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Ohio
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
State Senate Democratic Caucus planProposedDemocratic Ohio state Sens. Kenny Yuko and Vernon Sykes