UPDATED Oct. 16, 2021, at 4:20 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond.

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Texas
Status:Tabled
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
36 districts
majority
This map
38 districts+2
There are 13 Democratic-leaning seats, 24 Republican-leaning seats and 1 highly competitive seat in this proposed map.Change from old map: +5 Democratic-leaning seats, +2 Republican-leaning seats, -5 highly competitive seats.

Map source: Texas Republicans

The competitiveness and fairness of Texas's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Old mapD+2.3
First draft planR+12.0
Amended draft planR+12.3
Senate-passed planR+12.4
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapR+12.7
First draft planR+15.3
Senate-passed planR+15.3
Amended draft planR+15.3
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map6/36
Amended draft plan1/38
First draft plan1/38
Senate-passed plan1/38
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Texas
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Louie GohmertR
R+50
2nd
Kevin BradyR
R+30
3rd
Van TaylorR
R+24
4th
Pat FallonR
R+30
5th
Lance GoodenR
R+27
6th
Jake EllzeyR
R+21
7th
Lizzie Pannill FletcherD
D+25
8th
OPEN
R+25
9th
Al GreenD
D+51
10th
Michael T. McCaulR
R+24
11th
August PflugerR
R+41
12th
Kay GrangerR
R+24
13th
Ronny JacksonR
R+45
14th
Randy WeberR
R+35
15th
Vicente GonzalezD
EVEN
16th
Veronica EscobarD
D+33
17th
Pete SessionsR
R+26
18th
Sheila Jackson LeeD
D+45
19th
Jodey ArringtonR
R+53
20th
Joaquin CastroD
D+27
21st
Chip RoyR
R+24
22nd
Troy E. NehlsR
R+24
23rd
Tony GonzalesR
R+13
24th
Beth Van DuyneR
R+22
25th
Roger WilliamsR
R+32
26th
Michael BurgessR
R+26
27th
Michael CloudR
R+28
28th
Henry CuellarD
D+7
29th
Sylvia R. GarciaD
D+31
30th
Eddie Bernice JohnsonD
D+51
31st
John CarterR
R+27
32nd
Colin AllredD
D+25
33rd
Marc VeaseyD
D+45
34th
Filemon VelaD
D+17
35th
Lloyd DoggettD
D+38
36th
Brian BabinR
R+35
37th
OPEN
D+44
38th
Dan CrenshawR
R+27

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Texas

Oct. 14, 2021

On Oct. 13, a Texas House committee advanced a redistricting plan in a party-line vote, sending the map to the full chamber for consideration. Lawmakers didn’t accept any new amendments or proposed changes to the map. Instead, they merely advanced the redrawn congressional map as it came from the state Senate.

That Senate map, though, is significantly biased toward the GOP: It has an efficiency gap of 15.3 percentage points in Republicans’ favor (going by 2020 presidential results), and its median seat is 12.4 points redder than Texas as a whole going by FiveThirtyEight’s partisan lean.

The map creates 24 solid or likely Republican seats, 13 solid or likely Democratic seats and one swing seat (the 15th District) in the Rio Grande Valley. For comparison, Texas’s congressional delegation currently comprises 23 Republicans and 13 Democrats, so this map doesn’t boost Republicans’ gains in the state as much as it protects its incumbents. The map shores up a number of Republicans who currently sit in light-red seats that have been trending toward Democrats, including Reps. John Carter, Dan Crenshaw, Jake Ellzey, Michael McCaul, Troy Nehls, Chip Roy, Van Taylor and Beth Van Duyne. It accomplishes this largely by packing the bluest parts of the Houston, Dallas and Austin suburbs into Rep. Lizzie Pannill Fletcher’s 7th District, Rep. Colin Allred’s 32nd District and the newly created 37th District and conceding these seats to Democrats.

The map also makes the 28th District (currently Rep. Henry Cuellar’s) and 34th District (an open seat currently represented by Rep. Filemon Vela) in the Rio Grande Valley bluer while making Democratic Rep. Vicente Gonzalez’s seat a bit redder (it goes from a D+2 partisan lean to evenly split). Republican Rep. Tony Gonzales’s 23rd District, which was a perennial swing district last decade, has also gone from an R+5 to an R+13 partisan lean, likely putting it out of Democratic reach in all but the bluest of years.

Latest updates
Icon of the Texas state boundaries
Oct. 13
The Texas House Redistricting Committee advanced the state Senate's proposed congressional maps to the full chamber with no revisions or amendments  
Icon of the Texas state boundaries
Oct. 8
The Texas Senate adopted a new congressional redistricting plan. Senate Bill 6 now moves to the state House for debate and approval. The final plan must also be signed by Gov. Abbott.
Icon of the Texas state boundaries
Sept. 18
Texas state Senator Joan Huffman, chair of the Senate Special Redistricting Committee, published the committee's first draft of congressional districts using 2020 Census data. The Texas Legislature begins a 30-day special session on Sept. 20 to finalize its congressional and state legislative maps.

Latest changes 🤖

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Texas
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
Senate-passed planProposedTexas state Senate
Amended draft planTabledRepublican state Sen. Joan Huffman
First draft planTabledTexas Republicans