UPDATED May 20, 2022, at 5:12 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Florida
Status:Tabled
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
27 districts
majority
This map
28 districts+1
There are 8 Democratic-leaning seats, 15 Republican-leaning seats and 5 highly competitive seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: +1 Republican-leaning seat.
The competitiveness and fairness of Florida's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Plan S035C8060R+0.1
Plan S000C8042R+0.4
Plan S000C8036R+0.4
Plan S000C8040R+0.4
Plan S000C8038R+0.4
Plan S000C8022R+0.4
Plan S000C8018R+0.4
Plan S000C8024R+0.4
Plan S000C8020R+0.4
Plan S000C8006R+0.5
Plan S000C8002R+0.5
Plan S000C8008R+0.5
Plan S000C8004R+0.5
Plan S019C8052R+2.1
Plan H000C8015R+3.7
Plan H000C8019R+3.7
Plan H000C8017R+3.7
Plan S019C8062R+4.1
Plan H000C8011R+4.9
Plan H000C8003R+4.9
Plan H000C8001R+5.0
Plaintiffs' remedial proposalR+5.7
Old mapR+5.9
New mapR+6.0
Plan P000C0094R+6.2
Plan P000C0079R+6.5
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapR+5.4
Plan S035C8060R+5.9
Plan S000C8042R+5.9
Plan S000C8040R+5.9
Plan S000C8036R+5.9
Plan S000C8038R+5.9
Plan S000C8022R+5.9
Plan S000C8024R+5.9
Plan S000C8018R+5.9
Plan S000C8020R+5.9
Plan S000C8006R+5.9
Plan S000C8008R+5.9
Plan S000C8002R+5.9
Plan S000C8004R+5.9
Plan S019C8052R+9.5
Plan S019C8062R+9.5
Plan H000C8001R+9.6
Plan H000C8019R+13.0
Plan H000C8017R+13.0
Plan H000C8015R+13.0
Plan H000C8003R+13.1
Plan H000C8011R+13.2
Plan P000C0079R+13.7
Plaintiffs' remedial proposalR+17.0
New mapR+20.2
Plan P000C0094R+20.5
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Florida
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Matt GaetzR
R+38
2nd
Neal DunnR
R+37
3rd
Al LawsonD
D+15
4th
John RutherfordR
R+30
5th
Kat CammackR
R+23
6th
OPEN
R+21
7th
Michael WaltzR
Stephanie MurphyD
R+11
8th
Bill PoseyR
R+23
9th
Darren SotoD
D+17
10th
Val DemingsD
D+27
11th
Daniel WebsterR
R+25
12th
Gus M. BilirakisR
R+30
13th
Charlie CristD
R+2
14th
Kathy CastorD
D+4
15th
OPEN
R+3
16th
C. Scott FranklinR
R+23
17th
Vern BuchananR
R+15
18th
Greg SteubeR
R+32
19th
Byron DonaldsR
R+25
20th
Sheila Cherfilus-McCormickD
D+50
21st
Brian MastR
R+14
22nd
Lois FrankelD
D+14
23rd
Ted DeutchD
D+7
24th
Frederica WilsonD
D+51
25th
Debbie Wasserman SchultzD
D+19
26th
Mario Diaz-BalartR
R+14
27th
María Elvira SalazarR
EVEN
28th
Carlos A. GimenezR
R+3

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Florida

May 20, 2022

After passing the legislature, Florida’s congressional map is now in the courts. There’s two main options at hand: the map introduced and signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis, and one submitted by a Harvard professor that really only affects one district: the 5th.

The second map preserves the current configuration of the 5th District, while DeSantis’s map eliminates it. Running from Jacksonville to Tallahassee, the 5th District was specifically created to enhance the representation of Black voters in northern Florida — but DeSantis has called it illegal. After Democrats sued over DeSantis’s map, a judge ruled that it was “unconstitutional because it diminishes African Americans’ ability to elect candidates of their choice.” But DeSantis’s map will remain in place for now, as it was temporarily reinstated by an appeals court pending a final decision.

For now, plaintiffs were focusing specifically on getting the north Florida part of the map struck down in time for the 2022 elections, but in the longer term, the entire map is under legal challenge over its pro-Republican bias and dilution of Black voting power. The map has an efficiency gap of R+20 and would create four new Republican-leaning seats at the expense of three highly competitive ones. If the map is used in the 2022 election, Republicans would likely flip the Democratic-held 5th, 7th and 13th districts as well as gain a new member in the 15th District, which was added to the state’s tally by the 2020 census.

The map was first enacted in April after a drawn-out standoff between DeSantis and Republicans in the legislature. At first, legislators proposed and passed new congressional maps that had only mild Republican biases and would preserve a predominantly Black 5th District, which they argued was required by the Florida Constitution. But DeSantis insisted on a map that maximized the number of Republican seats and eliminated the predominantly Black 5th, which he said violated the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Latest updates
Icon of the Florida state boundaries
May 13
Florida's Secretary of State appealed a state court ruling that invalidated several of the state's new congressional districts. The appeal automatically results in a stay of the lower court opinion until the First District Court of Appeals hears the case.
Icon of the Florida state boundaries
May 11
A state judge in Florida invalidated part of the state's new congressional map as a violation of the federal Voting Rights Act. Judge Smith held that by eliminating a majority-Black district, the new map diminishes Black voting power in Northern Florida.
Icon of the Florida state boundaries
April 25
Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit in state court challenging the state's new congressional map. Plaintiffs argue that the new districts violate the state's constitution—namely the Fair Districts Amendment—because the map favors Republicans by a more than two-to-one margin, and because the map dilutes the power of racial minority voters.

Our latest coverage

Who controls redistricting in Florida right now?
Republicans fully control the congressional redistricting process. New maps are drawn and passed by the Republican state legislature and signed into law by the Republican governor.