UPDATED Oct. 16, 2021, at 4:20 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond.

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Georgia
Status:Proposed
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
14 districts
majority
This map
14 districts
There are 4 Democratic-leaning seats, 9 Republican-leaning seats and 1 highly competitive seat in this proposed map.Change from old map: +1 Republican-leaning seat, -1 highly competitive seat.
The competitiveness and fairness of Georgia's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Draft planR+11.0
Old mapR+11.9
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapR+7.2
Draft planR+15.9
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map2/14
Draft plan1/14
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Georgia
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Buddy CarterR
R+20
2nd
Sanford D. Bishop Jr.D
D+1
3rd
A. Drew FergusonR
R+29
4th
Hank JohnsonD
D+48
5th
Nikema WilliamsD
D+65
6th
Lucy McBathD
R+16
7th
Carolyn BourdeauxD
D+14
8th
Austin ScottR
R+34
9th
Andrew S. ClydeR
R+52
10th
Jody HiceR
R+34
11th
Barry LoudermilkR
R+22
12th
Rick AllenR
R+17
13th
David ScottD
D+49
14th
Marjorie Taylor GreeneR
R+56

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Georgia

Sept. 28, 2021

Republicans in Georgia’s state Senate released the first draft of Georgia’s new congressional district lines on Sept. 27, and the proposed map primarily changes the lay of the land around the Atlanta metropolitan area, where Democrats’ improved performance in 2020 helped the party carry the state in last November’s election and in two U.S. Senate runoffs in January. As drawn, the map would likely lead to a net gain of one seat for the GOP, shifting the state’s congressional delegation from eight Republicans and six Democrats to nine Republicans and five Democrats.

The most notable changes on the map come in the 6th and 7th districts, two swing seats Democrats captured in 2018 and 2020, respectively. Republican mapmakers have targeted the 6th District, held by Rep. Lucy McBath, by moving it from a D+1 partisan lean to R+16. They did this mainly by extending the 6th District up into Republican-leaning Forsyth County and removing parts of the district that lay in Democratic-leaning DeKalb County. However, it’s worth noting that Forsyth is an exurban county with a high share of college-educated voters, and while it’s still very Republican, it has moved sharply toward Democrats since the 2016 election. As a result, this version of the district might not be especially Republican-leaning turf for long.

Meanwhile, Republicans did concede a seat to Democrats on this map by packing Democratic voters into the neighboring 7th District, held by Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux, which moves from R+4 to D+14 under these draft lines. The district would almost entirely fall within Gwinnett County.

It’s anybody’s guess, however, whether the final Georgia map will look like this, as it’s possible Republicans could be more surgical and aggressive in other map proposals.

Latest updates
Icon of the Georgia state boundaries
Sept. 27
Republicans in the Georgia state Senate published a proposal for the state's new congressional districts.
Icon of the Georgia state boundaries
Sept. 23
Georgia's Governor called for a special session of the state legislature in order to draw new state legislature and congressional maps. The session will commence on Nov. 3, 2021.
Icon of the Georgia state boundaries
June 16
Georgia legislature announces town hall meeting schedule on the redistricting process.

Latest changes 🤖

Sept. 27, 2021

Draft plan Proposed

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Georgia
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
Draft planProposedRepublican Lt. Governor Geoff Duncan and Republican state Sen. John F. Kennedy