UPDATED Oct. 16, 2021, at 4:20 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond.

The partisan breakdown of Nebraska’s new map
Status:Approved
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
3 districts
majority
This map
3 districts
There are 2 Republican-leaning seats and 1 highly competitive seat in this proposed map.Change from old map: None.
The competitiveness and fairness of Nebraska's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
New mapD+7.7
Old mapD+4.1
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapD+5.1
New mapD+2.5
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map1/3
New map1/3
The demographic and partisan breakdown of Nebraska’s new map
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Jeff FortenberryR
R+17
2nd
Don BaconR
R+3
3rd
Adrian SmithR
R+57

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Nebraska

Sept. 30, 2021

On Sept. 30, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts signed the state’s new congressional map into law. The most controversial parts of the plan, which is now final, were the boundaries of the 2nd District, the state’s only swing district, which gave an electoral vote to Biden in the 2020 election. The new map still makes the district slightly redder by keeping Douglas County whole but pairing it with a Republican-leaning rural county. In the old map, the 2nd District had an even partisan lean; in the new map, its partisan lean is R+3. This gives a small boost to Republican Rep. Don Bacon, whose district had been trending more Democratic. It could also make it slightly more difficult for Democratic candidates to pick off an electoral vote in Nebraska in future presidential elections.

Latest updates
Icon of the Nebraska state boundaries
Sept. 30
Nebraska Gov. Ricketts signed Legislative Bill 1 (congressional districts) and Bill 3 (Unicameral districts) into law.
Icon of the Nebraska state boundaries
Sept. 17
A proposed congressional redistricting plan that would split Douglas County failed to overcome a filibuster in Nebraska's Unicameral. The Legislature's Redistricting Committee must now decide whether to adopt a proposal by state Sen. Justin Wayne, a Democrat, or to draw new maps altogether.
Icon of the Nebraska state boundaries
Sept. 16
Five of the Nebraska Legislature Redistricting Committee's nine members voted to move forward with the Republican-drawn congressional map that splits Douglas County (home of Nebraska's "blue dot" that awarded one electoral college vote to Obama in 2008 and to Biden in 2020).

Latest changes 🤖

Our latest coverage

Who controls redistricting in Nebraska in 2021?
Republicans fully control the congressional redistricting process. New maps are drawn and passed by the Republican state legislature and signed into law by the Republican governor.