UPDATED May 20, 2022, at 5:12 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Pennsylvania
Status:Proposed
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
18 districts
majority
This map
17 districts-1
There are 5 Democratic-leaning seats, 9 Republican-leaning seats and 3 highly competitive seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: -1 Democratic-leaning seat.
The competitiveness and fairness of Pennsylvania's maps
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Pennsylvania
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Mike KellyR
R+25
2nd
Conor LambD
R+7
3rd
Mike DoyleD
D+24
4th
Guy ReschenthalerR
R+36
5th
Glenn W. ThompsonR
R+39
6th
John JoyceR
R+39
7th
Fred KellerR
R+31
8th
Scott PerryR
R+18
9th
Lloyd SmuckerR
R+24
10th
Matt CartwrightD
Dan MeuserR
R+26
11th
Susan WildD
EVEN
12th
Chrissy HoulahanD
D+2
13th
Mary Gay ScanlonD
D+19
14th
Madeleine DeanD
D+30
15th
Brian FitzpatrickR
R+2
16th
Dwight EvansD
D+77
17th
Brendan BoyleD
D+41

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Pennsylvania

March 8, 2022

The U.S. Supreme Court has denied an injunction as requested by Pennsylvania Republicans who filed a lawsuit challenging the new map for the commonwealth’s congressional districts. The plaintiffs disputed the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s right to set the districts, calling it “unconstitutional.” However, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the case; instead it will be sent to a federal three-judge panel. However, this is unlikely to happen before the 2022 elections, meaning the new maps will likely remain in place for the midterms.

Pennsylvania’s Democratic-majority Supreme Court stepped in to finalize the maps after Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf vetoed the map chosen by the Republican-controlled state legislature, causing a stalemate. The court selected a final map that was submitted by a group of citizens who wanted to hew as closely as possible to the status quo while redrawing the district lines from 18 districts down to 17 as a result of the census. Their map was drawn by Jonathan Rodden, a political science professor at Stanford University and director of the university's Spatial Social Science Lab. The new map drops one Republican-leaning seat to leave eight Republican-leaning seats, six Democratic-leaning seats and three highly competitive seats. It has a median seat bias of R+1.3 but an efficiency gap of D+3.0, indicating a relatively fair map.

Latest updates
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
March 7
The U.S. Supreme Court denied the a request for an injunction, allowing the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's maps to take effect, while the case is pending review by a three-judge panel.
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
Feb. 28
Republicans filed an emergency application with Justice Alito seeking a stay of Pennsylvania's new congressional districts because they were adopted by the state Supreme Court without the state legislature's approval.
Icon of the Pennsylvania state boundaries
Feb. 23
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court adopted new congressional districts drawn by a special master.
Who controls redistricting in Pennsylvania right now?
Neither party fully controls the congressional redistricting process. New maps are drawn and passed by the Republican state legislature and signed into law by the Democratic governor.