UPDATED Jan. 24, 2022, at 11:30 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Rhode Island
Status:Tabled
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
2 districts
majority
This map
2 districts
There are 2 Democratic-leaning seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: None.
The competitiveness and fairness of Rhode Island's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Old mapD+0.8
Plan BD+0.4
Alternative "A"D+0.4
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Old mapD+28.8
Alternative "A"D+28.8
Plan BD+28.8
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map0/2
Alternative "A"0/2
Plan B0/2
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Rhode Island
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
David CicillineD
D+32
2nd
Jim LangevinD
D+17

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Rhode Island

Jan. 13, 2022

On Jan. 12, the Rhode Island Special Commission on Reapportionment voted 15-2 to move forward with a congressional map that is very similar to the current one. Like the original map, both of Rhode Island’s congressional seats will be solidly Democratic; in fact, both districts essentially retain their partisan leans. The map will now go to the legislature for its approval.

Latest changes 🤖

Jan. 13, 2022

Plan B Released

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Rhode Island
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
Plan BProposedRhode Island Commission on Reapportionment
Alternative "A"TabledRhode Island Commission on Reapportionment