UPDATED Dec. 2, 2021, at 4:09 PM

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State

An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond. How this works »

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The partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Tennessee
Status:Proposed
partisan lean of districts:
Old map
9 districts
majority
This map
9 districts
There are 2 Democratic-leaning seats and 7 Republican-leaning seats in this proposed map.Change from old map: None.
The competitiveness and fairness of Tennessee's maps
Median seat
Difference between the partisan lean of the state’s median district and the state as a whole.
Old mapR+9.0
Democratic proposalR+10.4
New map
Efficiency gap
Difference between each party’s share of “wasted votes” — those that don’t contribute to a candidate winning.
Democratic proposalR+6.0
Old mapR+7.0
New map
Competitiveness
The number of districts in the state whose partisan leans are between R+5 and D+5.
Old map0/9
Democratic proposal0/9
New map
The demographic and partisan breakdown of this proposed map in Tennessee
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
DistrictIncumbentPartisan leanRacial makeup
1st
Diana HarshbargerR
R+61
2nd
Tim BurchettR
R+33
3rd
Chuck FleischmannR
R+40
4th
Scott DesJarlaisR
R+34
5th
Jim CooperD
D+24
6th
John RoseR
R+59
7th
Mark E. GreenR
R+47
8th
David KustoffR
R+44
9th
Steve CohenD
D+42

The racial makeup of each district is of the voting-age population.

The latest in Tennessee

Nov. 17, 2021

Tennessee Democrats have released a map proposal that would shrink the state’s two Democratic-leaning districts to concentrate more tightly around liberal city centers in Memphis and Nashville. The map would not change the partisan breakdown of the state and has median seat and efficiency gaps similar to those of the old map.

But the redistricting process in the state is controlled by the Republican-led legislature, which is unlikely to embrace the Democrats’ proposal. For one thing, it would redraw the home of Republican Rep. Scott DesJarlais into a new district, giving him the unappetizing choice between running in a district he doesn’t live in or launching a primary challenge to neighboring Rep. John Rose. State Sen. Mike Bell, co-vice chairman of a Senate redistricting committee, told the Tennessee Lookout: “I can tell you, that’s not gonna happen.” Under Tennessee law, redistricting must be completed by April 7, 2022, the candidate filing deadline for both legislative and congressional seats.

Latest updates
Icon of the Tennessee state boundaries
Nov. 15
Democratic lawmakers in Tennessee have released a congressional redistricting plan. Republican lawmakers have signaled that they will unveil their own districting plan in January 2022.

Latest changes 🤖

Our latest coverage

All of the proposed maps in Tennessee
MapPlanStatusProposed byPartisan breakdown
Democratic proposalProposedTennessee Democrats